Slave Ads from1844
Here is another “Sun” Newspaper article on a runaway slave. The article appeared in the “Baltimore Sun” on August 3, 1844.


ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS REWARD - Ran away from the subscriber, living near Millersville, in Anne Arundel county, Md., on the 3d inst., a NEGRO MAN, who calls himself Joshua Ogle. This negro is a good looking, well set fellow. No particular marks, except a slight trembling in his hands; he is about 27 years old. He took away no clothes but what he had on, and they are not recollected. He left home with his brother and both were arrested on the 4th, near Wiseburg, Baltimore county, but the one here advertised escaped from the officers and is probably lurking in that neighborhood, or making h is way to York, Pa. where other parties were to meet him, as I have ascertained. He has no doubt changed him name, but may be easily detected, if closely questioned. as he is by no means smart. The above reward will be given if taken out of the State of Maryland, and $50 if taken in the State, and secured in jail so that I get him again.
(THE NAME OF THE OWNER IS NOT
LISTED ON THE ARTICLE)

Here is another “Sun” Newspaper article on a runaway slave. The article appeared in the “Baltimore Sun” on August 6, 1844.


ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY DOLLARS REWARD - Ranaway from the subscriber, living in Baltimore county, nine miles from the city on the 1st inst, two NEGRO BOYS, one calling himself NED WASHINGTON, about 19 years of age, 5 feet 7 or 8 inches high, has one tooth out in front, and when spoken to has rather a smile on his countenance - he took with him a mixed Cassinet frock coat and pants, also a pair of plaid gaiter pantaloons and morocco cap. The other calls himself MOSES JONES, he is about 18 years of age, 5 feet 6 or 7 inches high, well set, has a good countenance, and is a little bow-legged - had on when he left a blue Cloth runabout, dark cassinet pantaloons, figured Velvet vest, and Cloth cap; but in all possibility their dress will be changed, as they took with them fifty dollars in American Gold, among which was one ten dollar piece. The above reward will be given if taken out of the State, or one hundred dollars in the State, or in proportion if only one should be taken. They also stole a bay HORSE, six years old, about 15 hands high, heavy made, rides rough, steel toed shoes all round, right fore foot white, and a small star in the forehead. I will give ten dollars for information so that I get him again.
L. BROWN
near Cub Hill Post Office

Here is another “Sun” Newspaper article on a runaway slave. The article appeared in the “Baltimore Sun” on August 6, 1844.


TWENTY DOLLARS REWARD - Ran away from the subscriber, living in Baltimore county, near the Copper Factory, on the 8th of July, A NEGRO BOY, who calls himself Dick Johnson; he is about 5 feet high, and stout built - 17 or 18 years of age, with large, heavy eyes, wide mouth, and has lost the toes of his left foot by frost. His
clothes were of coarse linen. He was purchased two years ago from Capers Burns who carried on the soap and candle business on Saratoga Street. There is no doubt he is lurking about the city, as he has been seen once or twice lately up town. I will give the above reward to any one who will bring him home to me, or secure him in jail so that I get him again.

LEVI HIPSLEY,
near Cub Hill Post Office

Here is another “Sun” Newspaper article on a runaway slave. The article appeared in the “Baltimore Sun” on October 10, 1844:

TWENTY DOLLARS REWARD for John Jones, NEGRO MAN, who escaped over the jail wall Tuesday evening, between 6 and 7 o’clock (who had all the liberty of the boundry). The said negro is between forty and fifty years of age; stout made; very black; round shouldered; sultry (not sure of this word) eyes; down cast look; rather small nose; and very seldom speaks until spoken to. Had on when he escaped, light .......(not sure of word) cassinet Pantaloons, has two patches on the seat; a roundabout jacket of the same cloth, with a patch on each elbow; old white hat, and coarse negro shoes. Before committed to jail he lived on a farm belonging to Mrs. Towson, called Lime Kiln bottom, 10 miles rom Baltimore, on the Old Manor Road.

DAN’L STEEVER, Warden

Book Links:
It All Started on Winters Lane
The first published history of one the forty historically Black settlements in Baltimore County, MD

The Oblate Sisters of Providence

The Buffalo Soldiers
African-Americans have fought in military conflicts since colonial days.

Holding On To Their Heritage
A comprehensive book which documents the history of the historic black communities.

In Our Voices
In Our Voices chronicles the stories of many families that founded the African American settlements.

Run away Slave Ads
These Ads were extract from Baltimore Sun Newspapers.
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