Slave Ads from1849
Here is another “Sun” Newspaper article on a runaway slave. The article appeared in the “Baltimore Sun” on August 18, 1849:

TWELVE HUNDRED DOLLARS REWARD - Ran away from the subscribers living on Long Green, Baltimore county, on the night of the 11th of August, SIX NEGROES: Henry Gassaway, mulatto, aged 48 years, 5 feet, 7 inches high; Charles Gassaway, light brown, 23 years of age, 5 feet 7 inches; Henry Gassaway, boy, 12 years of age, a light brown; Ben Bordley, 28 years of age, black, 5 feet 10 inches; Harry Boardly, 28 years of age, black, 5 feet 10 inches; Caleb Rollins, mulatto, 26 years of age, 5 feet 10 inches.

The above reward will be given to any person or persons who will apprehend and secure them in jail, so that the owners may get them again. Two Hundred Dollars will be given for any one of the above runaways.
JOHN BALDWIN
THOMAS GORSUCH
J. HILLEN JENKINS
JAMES GITTINGS

Here is another “Sun” Newspaper article on a runaway slave. The article appeared in the “Baltimore Sun” on February 16, 1849:

$20 REWARD - Ran away from the subscriber, on the 1st instant, a NEGRO WOMAN, who goes by the name of JULIA GREGGS or Julia Holland, about 40 years of age, slender made; small feet, 5 feet 1 or 2 inches high, light chestnut color. Had a gathering on the left side of her jaw, her face was somewhat swollen, and acne lumps on her neck. Had on when she left home, a plaid linsay (not too sure of this word) frock, with a light calico over it, and a straw bonnet. I will give the above reward if taken out of this State, or $10 if taken in this State, and secured so I can get her.

DANIEL STANSBURY
Patapsco Neck, Baltimore County

Here is another “Sun” Newspaper article on a runaway slave. The article appeared in the “Baltimore Sun” on July 25, 1849:

TEN DOLLARS REWARD - Ran away from the subscriber on the 1st inst., a colored BOY named DICK OBLEBE. Has an awkward appearance and is slow in movement and talk; and has a mark near the eye. Had on when he left a Summer Cloth Coat, Cloth Cap, and stripped or check Pantaloons. The above reward will be given if secured so that I get him.

I. COOKE
Baltimore County, near Pikesville

Here is another “Sun” Newspaper article on a runaway slave. The article appeared in the “Baltimore Sun” on May 28, 1849:

ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY DOLLARS REWARD - Ran away from the subscriber on the 25th inst., negro man OTHO ADAMS, about six feet high, weighs about 200 lbs, bright mulatto, good looking, round face, curly hair, had on a black fur or silk hat, black close (not sure about this word) coat, dark striped pants, dark striped silk vest, stripes pale; boots, silk cravat with yellowish stripes; yellow silk handkerchief; has a mother in Washington, on or near Capital Hill, named Lily Adams. I will give the above reward if secured in jail in Baltimore city so that I get him again.

WILLIAM HOLMES
York Road, near 1st Toll Gate

Now, this is an interesting article. As I read and typed the article, I envisioned a high-stepping Black man dressede to kill. I envisioned a person who stood out like a lit candle - not a runaway slave! But then looking at his complextion, I also envisioned a person who could have passed as a well-to-do White man! I know all of my visions of this person is way out, but they are my first thoughts and impressions. What’s yours?

Can anyone tell me what are “stripes pale?” (Dictionary only refers to Pale as “colorless” or “light complextion”, or words to that effect). What is a “silk cravat with yellowish stripes?”(seems to be some type of scarf!).

In any case, I hope someone from Afrigeneas can use this information, especially someone researching the name of Adams from Washington. This is the first article I ever noticed that the runaway parent’s name was mentioned.

Louis S. Diggs

Here is another “Sun” Newspaper article on a runaway slave. The article appeared in the “Baltimore Sun” on May 9, 1849:

FIFTY DOLLARS REWARD - Ranaway on the night of the 30th April, from the employ of Mr. William Shipley, five miles from Baltimore, Negro Boy “NED” formerly belonging to James Webb, deceased. He is about 18 years of age, five feet high, and inclinded to be yellow - has a bushy head of hair, large nose, thick pouting lips, an inward voice, not pleasant when spoken to, and won’t look you in the face - clothes not known, other than that he wore away a cap. He has been hired in Baltimore the last three years previous to living with Mr. Shipley. I will give the above reward, if taken out of the State of Maryland, or $30 if taken in the State, or city of Baltimore. He may be lurking about Baltimore, or trying to make his way off. Apply to

M.E. WOOWARD
No 244 W. Fayette Street
Baltimore, Md.

This is a strange ad. This is the first I have run across whereas the person is not listed as a slave, or was implied to be a slave, but a worker! Doesn’t it seem rather odd to have such an advertisement for a worker. Slavery is not listed; even the previous person is listed as the employer of Ned. And then Ned is “inclinded to be yellow.” Does he change colors?

Also, members of Afrigeneas who read these articles, the last article that listed Julia Creggs who ranaway on February 16, 1849, there was a reference to the type of clothing she wore when she ran away. She had on some type of “plaid linsey frock” that several people inquired about. Valerie Vaughn straightened out that problem. Valerie indicated that “linsey was a type of light wool used back then for slave clothing.” Thanks for clearing that up, Valerie.

Here is another “Sun” Newspaper article on a runaway slave. The article appeared in the “Baltimore Sun” on November 8, 1849:

ABSCONDED FROM HOME, On Tuesday morning, the 30th ult, a YELLOW BOY, by the name of ALEXANDER PARAWAY. He had on when he left, an old straw hat, cloth pantaloons, check shirt and dark jacket. I hereby forewarn all persons not to harbor or employ the said boy at the peril of the law. A liberal reward will be paid for his return to me.
JAMES PARAWAY
2 l/2 miles from the city, on the Frederick Road

Here is another “Sun” Newspaper article on a runaway slave. The article appeared in the “Baltimore Sun” on (not sure of the date, but I believe it was in late October, 1849):

$100 REWARD - Ran away from the subscriber, on the 20th of October, aa Colored Woman, calling herself ELIZA PINKNEY, who is about 35 years of age, 5 feet 6 inches in height, very stout made, and deeply pitted from the small pox. It is supposed she will be with her husband, Bill Pinkney, (the property of Horatio Strong), who ran away at the same time; he is about 6 feet high, of very dark color, and pleasant when spoken to. The above reward will be given to any one who will apprehend the Woman, or give such information as will enable the subscriber to get her again. Information can be given by writing the subscriber, at Little Gun Powder Post-office, Baltimore county, Md.
GEORGE W. KENLY
(Philad. Ledger and Lancaster Intelligence, copy each to the amount of $1, and charge this office.)

A couple of things came to my mind as I typed this article. One, is that in my mind, this seems to be the type of situation where a husband and wife were involved in the underground railroad. Don’t know why I have that feeling, but I do; second, for people researching the various newspaper articles about runaway slaves, the Philadelphia Ledger and the Lancaster Intelligence obviously publish run away slave articles, and the third thing is that of the numerous articles I have posted, I have yet to encounter a slave with the same name as the owner, hmm!, makes you wonder.

Here is another “Sun” Newspaper article on a runaway slave. The article appeared in the “Baltimore Sun” on October 15, 1849:

ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS REWARD - Ranaway from the subscriber on Sunday, the 7th inst. , (living adjoining Watersville Granite Quarry, in Baltimore county, about 1 1/2 miles from Woodstock Post Office, in Howard, District, NEGRO MAN BEN, calling himself BENJAMIN MARSHALL HARDY, Ben is about 26 years of age, is a stout, heavy set man, about 5 feet 7 inches high, one of his little fingers stiff, and stands straight; he has a small scar on the hind part of his right leg, between the ankle and calf; his fingers long and tapering; his feet remarkably large, broad and flat; his complexion brown black; slow of speech and remarkably intelligent. I will give Fifty dollars is taken in Baltimore city, and the above reward if taken any where else and returned to me.

CALEB D. OWINGS.
Baltimore co., Oct 11, 1849

Here is another “Sun” Newspaper article on a runaway slave. The article appeared in the “Baltimore Sun” on October 3, 1849:

RAN AWAY from the subscriber, on the 1st of Sept., a dark copper colored WOMAN goes by the name of MARY SNOWDEN, 31 years of age, about four feet six or seven inches high; has two front teeth out below. Had with her a child about two years old. I will pay $15 for both if taken in the city, or $30 if taken in the county, or $50 if caught out of state. She has been seen in the eastern part of the city some time during the past two weeks. I will pay the above reward for them if caught and lodged in Campbell’s Jail or delivered to the subscriber.

WILLIAM MANSFIELD
Middle River Neck, Baltimore County

Here is another “Sun” Newspaper article on a runaway slave. The article appeared in the “Baltimore Sun” on October 9, 1849:

FOUR HUNDRED AND FIFTY DOLLARS REWARD FOR THIEF AND RUNAWAYS - Ran away from the subscriber, Sept. 30th, two NEGRO WOMEN and CHILD. NACKEY JACKSON, about five feet high, thick set and round with good figure and light color; very good looking, and good teeth. She took several articles of silver ware, etc, among which was a large sugar dish and cream pot, marked W.E.H. She has with her a child, named LUCY, four and a half years old; about her color; with round face and fine black eyes, with a laughing look out of them when pleased, and fat figure. CASSY, about five feet high, very black, and, when pleased, shows her teeth, which are very white and regular; has a sort of affected look when speaking; not quite so fleshy as Nackey. They took several articles of clothing not recollected. I will give for Nackey and Child, $250, and for Cassy $200, if delivered in Jail, in Baltimore City, so I get them again.

WM. HOLMES,
York Road near First Gate

Here is another “Sun” Newspaper article on a runaway slave. The article appeared in the “Baltimore Sun” on September 12, 1849:

FIFTY DOLLARS REWARD - Ran away from the subscriber, living near Reisterstown, Baltimore county, my Negro Man CHARLES THOMAS, 20 years old, 5 feet 11 inches high; black, wears ear-rings and had on when he left a black coat and pants, and a narrow brim silk hat. I will give Fifty Dollars if taken out of the State, and Twenty-five Dollars if taken in the State, and secured in jail so that I can get him.

GABRIEL MORAN
For further information, address DR. JNO J. MORAN, Baltimore

This advertisement makes me think of a man, born in Africa, still carrying on traditions of wearing rings on his ears. If anyone is researching for their roots in the Reisterstown, MD area, I have just completed a books on the history of the historic Black community in Reisterstown and have encountered many, many names of Black persons that I am willing to share. I have the names of many Blacks buried in the cemetery of St. Luke’s UM Church there, names of slaves back as far as 1834, names of slaves in several wills, and the names of many Blacks buried by the White local funeral establishment. I’m hoping to have my book published by Black History Month, but will assist anyone searching in that area now. Just e-mail me.

Book Links:
It All Started on Winters Lane
The first published history of one the forty historically Black settlements in Baltimore County, MD

The Oblate Sisters of Providence

The Buffalo Soldiers
African-Americans have fought in military conflicts since colonial days.

Holding On To Their Heritage
A comprehensive book which documents the history of the historic black communities.

In Our Voices
In Our Voices chronicles the stories of many families that founded the African American settlements.

Run away Slave Ads
These Ads were extract from Baltimore Sun Newspapers.
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